Financial Literacy Initiative and Gondwana sign memorandum

Saving, borrowing, budgeting – the Financial Wellness Workplace Program, offered by the Financial Literacy Initiative (FLI), revolves around these topics.

Francois Brand (Manager of the FLI Secretariat) and Silke Ahrens (Gondwana’s Training Coordinator) signed a memorandum on 29 July 2014 to implement the FLI Financial Wellness Workplace Program.

FLI and Gondwana are pleased with their good cooperation (from left): Francois Brand (Manager of the FLI Secretariat), Maria Mvula (Junior Trainer, Gondwana), Silke Ahrens (Training Coordinator, Gondwana), Riturumikua Hei (Action Group Head of Media, FLI), Olivia Amathila (Action Group Training Coordinator, FLI), Hilma Amutenya (Human Resources Manager, Gondwana)

FLI and Gondwana are pleased with their good cooperation (from left): Francois Brand (Manager of the FLI Secretariat), Maria Mvula (Junior Trainer, Gondwana), Silke Ahrens (Training Coordinator, Gondwana), Riturumikua Hei (Action Group Head of Media, FLI), Olivia Amathila (Action Group Training Coordinator, FLI), Hilma Amutenya (Human Resources Manager, Gondwana)

The memorandum identifies the criteria for cooperation between the two partners and the key areas of the training initiative. This includes the coordination of textbooks, content and evaluation of the program’s efficiency, among others.

The FLI training initiative was started in three lodges of the Gondwana group: Damara Mopane Lodge, Etosha Safari Lodge and Etosha Safari Camp. A number of employees were trained to present the program and have since conducted courses for their colleagues.

The key subject areas of the FLI Financial Wellness Workplace Program are:

  1. Basic Mathematics & Numeracy
  2. Money and Wellbeing
  3. Save Wise & Savings Plan
  4. Budget Wise
  5. Spend Wise
  6. Bank Accounts
  7. Borrow Wise
  8. Finances and your Children
  9. Retirement
  10. Managing a Side Business

The Financial Literacy Initiative (FLI) is a national platform which is mandated to improve the financial skills of private individuals and micro, small and medium enterprises. The initiative currently consists of more than 40 platform partners from the private, public and civil sectors in Namibia who jointly strive to address the target groups’ needs with regard to financial competence and consumer protection.

Commissioned by the government of Germany, the FLI was initiated in 2009 by the Ministry of Finance with the support of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ, German Federal Enterprise for International Cooperation).

Teaching aids such as posters, leaflets and textbooks have been translated into various Namibian languages and are available from the FLI Secretariat free of charge.

FLI also employs interactive educational methods like street theatre, TV and Radio shows as well as courses on finance for private individuals as well as small and medium enterprises in Namibia.

Companies interested in the FLI Financial Wellness Workplace Program are welcome to contact the FLI secretariat.

Contact us:

Financial Literacy Initiative

Ministry of Finance, Fiscus Building, Tel. 061-2092297

info@fli-namibia.org

www.fli-namibia.org

www.facebook.com//finlitnam

Gondwana Collection Namibia

Human Resources Department, Tel. 061 23 00 66

hradmin@gondwana-collection.com

www.gondwana-collection.com

www.facebook.com/gondwana.collection.namibia

 

 

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Book launch: The First World War in Namibia

100 years have passed since the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914. The hope that the German colonies, and thus German South West Africa, would not be drawn into the hostilities proved fruitless. Already on 13 September the war spread to present-day Namibia when a mounted South African regiment attacked the German police station at Ramansdrift on the border.

The first battle between troops of the Union Defence Force and the Schutztruppe for German South West Africa took place on 26 September 1914 at the Sandfontein watering hole between the Orange River and Warmbad.

A well emplaced Schutztruppe machine gun position commanding the flat terrain in front of it at Aus. (Museum Africa)

A well emplaced Schutztruppe machine gun position commanding the flat terrain in front of it at Aus. (Museum Africa)

The First World War in Namibia by Gordon McGregor and Mannfred Goldbeck marks the hundredth anniversary of the 1914–1918 World War. The Great War or the First World War, as it later became known, continues to cast an immense shadow on us today, its course and effects having played a large part in shaping the world as we know it.

As one of the countries outside of Europe that was drawn into the war, inadvertently embroiled in the unique situation that was transpiring in the Union of South Africa, Namibia’s history warrants inclusion in the worldwide WWI centenary commemorations.

An easily readable account of the war in German South West Africa, The First World War in Namibia adds interesting detail and aspects of the period not generally dealt with in classic history books. This includes the role of the indigenous population in the campaign, the plight of the animals and the various medals awarded.

General Botha inspects the South African troops in Lüderitzbucht. (South African War Museum)

General Botha inspects the South African troops in Lüderitzbucht. (South African War Museum)

It complements Gondwana’s History Series and is a noteworthy addition to the texts documenting Namibia’s rich history.

The book is available from Friday, 22 August 2014 at the Gondwana offices in Klein Windhoek (42 Nelson Mandela Ave, access from Dr. Kwame Nkrumah – old Gevers St. ) as well as at the lodges.

Gordon McGregor, Mannfred Goldbeck: The First World War in Namibia. Gondwana Collection Namibia, Windhoek 2014, ISBN 978-99916-896-4-7, 180 pages, N$195.00)

The First World War in Namibia book cover

The First World War in Namibia book cover

The German version of “The First World War in Namibia” will be available as of October 2014.

The second book “Auf verlorenem Posten” will only be available in German.

Walter Nuhn: Auf verlorenem Posten. Der Erste Weltkrieg in Deutsch-Südwestafrika (erhältlich ab 22. August, ISBN 978-99916-896-61, 364 Seiten, 295 N$)

Der Erste Weltkrieg traf die deutschen Kolonien völlig unvorbereitet. Die Reichsregierung hatte auf die Einhaltung der Neutralitätsbestimmungen der Kongoakte durch die anderen Mächte vertraut und deshalb Abwehrmaßnahmen stets abgelehnt.

In einer besonders prekären Lage befand sich dabei Deutsch-Südwestafrika wegen seiner Nachbarschaft zur mächtigen Südafrikanischen Union. Dem englandhörigen Premier, Burengeneral Botha, war Deutsch-Südwest schon lange „ein Dorn im Fleische Südafrikas“. Mit dem Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkrieges sah er die Gelegenheit gekommen, den „Dorn herauszuziehen“. Mit Lug und Trug glückte es ihm, Parlament und Presse seines Landes die Mär von einer drohenden Invasion Südafrikas durch die angeblich hoch gerüstete südwester Schutztruppe glaubhaft zu machen.

Ein Teil der Buren rebellierte gegen Bothas Kriegspläne, doch sie wurden rasch zur Räson gebracht. Der Premier holte zum Schlag gegen Südwest aus. Dank der gewaltigen Übermacht seiner hochmobilen Reiter gelang es ihm schon bald, in Blitzkriegmanier die Schutztruppe immer wieder auszumarschieren und schließlich im Norden bei Korab einzuschließen.

Der Kommandeur der Schutztruppe, Oberstleutnant Franke, ein im Hererokrieg hoch dekorierter, nun aber durch langen Kolonialdienst nervlich zerrütteter Offizier, sah sich in eine vermeintlich hoffnungslose Lage versetzt. An sich selbst und am Kampfgeist seiner Soldaten zweifelnd gab er gegen den Widerstand vieler seiner Offiziere den Kampf auf. Er kapitulierte mit seiner fast noch völlig intakten Truppe. Eine mehr als dreißigjährige deutsche Kolonialära war zu Ende.

Entstanden unter Verarbeitung zahlreicher in- und ausländischer Quellen, schildert dieses Werk einen der letzten nur mit klassischer Schlachtenkavallerie geführten Feldzüge.

Walter Nuhn: Auf verlorenem Posten. Der Erste Weltkrieg in Deutsch-Südwestafrika

Walter Nuhn: Auf verlorenem Posten. Der Erste Weltkrieg in Deutsch-Südwestafrika

 

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Traveling with Kids in Namibia

Why do you travel and go on holiday: to relax and get away from it all? In your younger more single years, it was easy to throw a toothbrush and a bathing suit in a backpack and drive to nowhere at all. Traveling with kids, entails a bit more planning and the thought alone can give you the heebie-jeebies. Luxury establishments on an exotic island offer kid-clubs where you can drop them off and go shopping, but this isn’t the ideal and in Namibia, not a big possibility. So what do you do with your 3 year old who has just discovered that the word ‘why’ attracts much more attention than her cute scrunched up nose. To top it off, the term ‘because’ is not an adequate answer anymore.

Image source: IN S.T.E.P.P.S

Image source: IN S.T.E.P.P.S

There are ways to keep the kids occupied while you take the breather you deserve. I’m not saying your kids are the noose around your neck, but you can only explain why the giraffe has a long neck so many times and playing hide and seek around the cabin at the lodge gets tiring after a while right? I don’t have children of my own, yet, but I am an aunt of beautiful kids whom I have traveled with and I have called in expert advice from my friends.

In the car

I guess the biggest challenge is traveling from point A to B and C and D (in Namibia this can easily be the whole alphabet) and we all know the nagging sentence that suddenly bursts out from the back of the car: “Are we there yet”? There are various solutions to keep the nagging to a minimum. Car games will not only keep them occupied but it’s such a fun way to involve everyone and make the road feel shorter.
I have jotted down a few ideas for you. (Please leave me a comment if you know some more exciting ways to keep the kids occupied)
The Singing Game – One person starts singing a song and stops singing somewhere random. The word the song was ended on, is the beginning of another song using that word. Example:

You Are My Sunshine
My only sunshine.
You make me happy……..

The next person must now sing a song that starts with “happy”

Happy days are here again
The skies above are clear again
So let’s sing a song of cheer again
Happy days are here again

It’s not as easy as it sounds but i can guarantee it will provide hours of fun and laughter.
Other games to play in the car includes: I spy something with my little eye or 20 questions. For a whole lot of other car games, click here.

Activities at the lodge

There are some clever ways to get your children involved in nature and to keep themselves busy without working on your nerves.
This one takes a bit of planning.

You will need :
• An empty jar / container
• Empty envelopes
• Empty box to place envelopes in.
• All kinds of children activities like puzzles etc

Fill each envelope with activities like a puzzle or glue and scissors etc. Mark the envelope with its contents and on a little piece of paper write down the names of the envelopes.
Place these pieces of paper, folded, into the jar and when they get bored with whatever they are busy with, they have to draw a paper from the jar and this way they choose themselves by means of chance what they will be doing next. A very exciting way of keeping everyone happy without telling them what they should do.

Another great idea is to buy your children a disposable camera or a cheap digital one and give them a list of things – animals / plants that is found in the area. They must go on a treasure hunt to find the items on the list and photograph it.
Upon returning home, the excitement continues when the photos are to be developed or printed.

Journals are a fun way to get children to have keepsakes of their journeys and travels. Give each child a box, container of their choice. This will be their treasure chest on the journey. In this chest, include a diary/sketchpad and crayons. Encourage them to write down / draw the things they see, eat, do and feel. Get them to collect treasures along the way like a beautiful stone, or a thorn that pinched their toe. Get maps of the area for them to circle where they have been and what they have seen. Just think about it: when grandma and grandpa come over for a visit, the kids will have hours of stories to share.
In the evenings, bring back old traditions by telling stories under the stars.
I have found a very nifty blog with all kinds of neat ideas to make your life not just easier, but your holiday less of a hassle – Kids-activities blog

Here are some images for you to print out courtesy of freegreatimages.com

Jungle Animals Coloring Pages 8Coloring-pages-of-animals-that-hibernate  17-giraffe-04

Do you have any other ideas, on children activities when traveling in Namibia? I would love to know.

Jessica Thomas is a local freelance writer. She is an eccentric young lady who has a love affair with writing. Get on board her journey of discovery.

Jessica Thomas

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