Why you should visit the Kalahari Farmhouse

Working for Gondwana definitely has its perks, and sitting on my own little terrace in front of my room with a refreshing drink in hand… it is obvious that life cannot get much better than this. In the past week, my work took me to The Kalahari Farmhouse.

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

"comfortably located in the small town of Stampriet"

“comfortably located in the small town of Stampriet”

A small lodge owned by the Gondwana Collection, comfortably located in the small town of Stampriet.

Image: Micheal Spencer

Image: Micheal Spencer

Image: Micheal Spencer

Image: Micheal Spencer

Currently the lodge is closed to the public as it is the home of the Gondwana Training Academy.

Courses have been offered over the past few weeks, ranging from maintenance and bartending, to cooking. And thanks to the role I play in the grand scheme of things, I got to break away from the hustle of the city.

Kalahari Farmhouse is by far my favourite Gondwana property. Simply because it does not try, it does not need to.

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

The entire property, from the vineyards that run along the road as you approach, to the smiling managers as they meet you at the entrance, is effortless.

When you walk through the entry way toward reception, it is easy to forget that you are in the Kalahari. Instantly, you feel transported into another world, an enchanted forest.

KALAHARI_FARMHOUSE8 5

“When you walk through the entry way toward reception” – Kalahari Farmhouse

I always wait for the garden faeries to come dancing across the tree branches. The Farmhouse garden is stunning in a way that is difficult to explain.

Massive palm trees stretching into the blue sky, with their giant branches lacing through the branches of other ancient trees. You are immediately sheltered from the harsh desert heat.

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

“Massive palm trees stretching into the blue sky” – Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

The sound of bubbling water is a constant companion as the artesian well pushes the water up to the surface and small channels lead the fresh waters to the farm gardens.

And when you walk into the main building, you cannot help but feel at home.

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Lounge at Kalahari Farmhouse – Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Your great grandmother’s piano is placed in the foyer and as you walk into the bar lounge, large, leather couches invite you into their embrace.

_K2R4100

Bar area st Kalahari Farmhouse – Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Something I have always been adamant about, it that I don’t want a hotel or lodge to feel like home… I want to feel comfortable and welcome, but it should definitely not be a second home. But here, you are home.

It’s not that anything looks like a house or that it is boring or traditional.

_K2R4104

Rather that you cannot help but feel at ease and comfortably content when you are there. And this is exactly how I found myself on my little terrace, sitting in a rocking chair with the lodge cat snoozing on the seat beside mine, watching the summer rain drip down the edge of the terrace roof.

Kalahari Farmhouse is truly a special place and is always there to welcome you with open arms when the city life gets too much.

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

Image: Judy & Scott Hurd

The lodge will be open to the public again at the end of April, and I look forward to getting back to my little terrace as soon as possible.

If you have ever been to Farmhouse, please share your experience with us in the comment section below.

Author – Jescey Visagie is a proud Namibian and is passionate about writing and language. Tag along for the ride as she tries to uncover new insights into Namibia and explores what the country has to offer.

Jescey Visagie

(491)

How the Raining Season affects Namibia

At long last, after a seemingly endless drought, the rain has finally arrived. Having said that, this in no way implies that Namibia’s water problems have been solved. In reality, this year has shown a lower average rainfall than over the same period last year. However, we cannot let this get us down! We are Namibians and it shows through our reactions when we hear the rumbling of the thunder as it moves our way.

Windhoek Rain

Windhoek Rain

Namibia may be the only place where it is considered bad luck to use an umbrella in the rain…you might just chase the rain away! So as we are all rain lovers here, proven by the enthusiastic response to our Gondwana Rain Photo Competition, we decided to look at what the season has brought so far.

Rain Namibia

Rain Namibia

Starting in the south, the Canyon has had quite a bit of rain to enjoy. Starting the New Year off with the rains that brought down the Holoog River. In the same area 64mm was recorded! The Fish River also saw some action at Koelkrans (a camping spot in the Gondwana Canyon Park).

Holoog Rain

Holoog Rain

Since then things have only gotten better. Many of the rivers between Rehoboth and Keetmanshoop received some flow. In some places, like Tsumeb, we even saw flash floods!

The rainfall has also allowed for all kinds of little critters to come out of hiding. A good example is the Giant African Bullfrog. Apparently these little guys are quite a delicious delicacy.

Bull Frog Namibia

Bull Frog Namibia

And along with the green frogs that are coming out of hiding, we find more and more greenery popping from the soil. Even in the Kalahari Desert at Kalahari Anib Lodge, you will notice green grass stretching into the distance. Just as it is in and around Windhoek. The city finally looks alive again, with fresh leave and buds visible on all the trees.

Kalahari Desert Rain

Kalahari Desert Rain

Then of course, the most important consequence of the rain…the dams are finally receiving some inflow. A fantastic sign for the country, as we so desperately need the water. And again, we are not nearly close to having our problems solved. At least we have a solid start to the process.

Here are some of the images we received in the Rain Photo Competition… (the other stunning photos can be viewed on our Facebook page).

Namibia Rain Competition by Gondwana Collection

Namibia Rain Competition by Gondwana Collection

Namibia Rain Competition by Gondwana Collection

Namibia Rain Competition by Gondwana Collection

If you have any other rain related information or stories, we invite you to share them in our comment section below.

 

(29)

How to keep warm in a Namibian winter

13 ways to keep warm in a Namibian winter.

Cuddle time has officially arrived in Namibia and once the cold has crept into your bones, it becomes difficult to get the warmth back in. And with the drought, staying warm has become more complicated than a hot bubble bath. So we thought to compile a list of ways to keep warm in ways that don’t require bath tubs or vast amounts of electricity.

Cover your windows–When the glass in the windows gets cold, it actually cools down the entire room! To keep the room temperature nice and snug, keep those windows covered. Make sure the windows are closed properly before you cover them (curtains or blankets, whichever way suits you best) because you don’t need a draft rendering your ‘coverings’ useless.

Cover windows - Image: Pinterest

Cover windows – Image: Pinterest

Hot water bottles! – People tend to dismiss this little gem too quickly, but it is a great way to stay warm. Put a hot water bottle into your bed an hour before you plan on turning in, you will find your bed warm and cosy and falling asleep will be quick and painless.

Hot water bottle - Image: Distractify website

Hot water bottle – Image: Distractify website

Exercise! –  This may be an obvious one, but getting your blood pumping will keep you warm for a while.

Hot Beverages – As we all know, a warm drink can soothe your soul. It can also help to warm you up if the chill starts to get to you. Hot Chocolate, Tea or Coffee can give you that lovely warm feeling when you drink it and who doesn’t want that feeling?

Hot drinks - Image: Wedding bells

Hot drinks – Image: Wedding bells

Build a fort – Why not? Piling all the pillows and blankets into a nice and cosy fort is an ideal way to relive your childhood and keep warm in a way that is cost effective and fun!

Fort - Image: Buzzfeed

Fort – Image: Buzzfeed

Layer your clothing – If you are only wearing one jersey and complaining about the cold, go straight back home and grab another jersey, jacket or coat. Layers can keep you warm and insulate your body heat to stay within the layers of clothing, instead of escaping into the cold air. Given by the end of all your layering you may look like the Michelin-Man, but at least you won’t be cold.

Michelin-man - Image: PMGS website

Michelin-man – Image: PMGS website

Use carpets – Most modern houses come with tiled floors and very few carpeted rooms. To escape cold floor, use area rugs or carpets to insulate and keep the space you move in, warm.

Shower with the door open – A very strange and unexpected tip, and it is a whole lot easier to use when you’re living along, but by showering with the door open you actually allow the warm air from the bathroom to fill the entire house.

Get a cuddle buddy –If you don’t have someone special, pets make fantastic buddies too!

Cuddle buddies - Image: A place to love dogs website

Cuddle buddies – Image: A place to love dogs website

Comfort Food – This is the perfect way to subdue those winter cravings and to keep warm! Stews, soups and baked goods will always serve their purpose to indulge and satisfy.

Comfort food - Image: Eat at allies

Comfort food – Image: Eat at Allies

Let the sun in – Keeping windows closed/covered is good in the evenings or in places with little sun during the winter months. However Namibia has the winter sun to keep us warm during the day. Keep curtains drawn during the day to let the sun fill the room with bright warmth.

Keep your feet warm – Toasty feet help keep your whole system warm. Be sure to wear socks whenever you can, especially woolly ones.

Wear socks - Image: Tumblr

Wear socks – Image: Tumblr

Light a fire – Fireplaces are the perfect way to warm a room and give some atmosphere to a space! Two birds with one stone.

Fireplace - Image: Pinterest

Fireplace – Image: Pinterest

If you have used any of these tricks and hacks or if you have a few of your own to add to the list, we invite you to share them in the comment section below. Beat the cold this winter and stay warm!

Unfortunately these steps cannot help everyone keep warm this winter…We ask that if you have any jackets or blankets you no longer use or need that you please bring them to the Gondwana Collection’s head offices. The Gondwana Memes – our social outreach activists – will make sure these are distributed to communities around Namibia where the need is most prevalent. Help others to layer-up this winter and to beat the cold too!

blankets cover page 2

Our head offices are located at 42 Nelson Mandela Avenue, Windhoek. If you need any additional information please feel free to contact me at content@gondwana-collection.com

Author – Jescey Visagie is a proud Namibian and is passionate about writing and language. Tag along for the ride as she tries to uncover new insights into Namibia and explores what the country has to offer.

PP for Blog

 

(105)