The lioness had grown old and frail and could no longer do any of the hard work she needed to do each day. She went out and gathered all the children from the community in order for them to work and take care of her.

©Anna Heupel

Ddi-xerreten visited the lioness’ home and he saw all the children she had gathered and was very disturbed that the children had been taken away from their people. Ddi-xerretten waited outside the lioness’ home until she left to drink water at the river stream. He sat down and called the children. He said to the children, “O children, sitting here! The fire of your people is at the top of the ravine, which comes down from the top of the hill.” Two of the children understood what Ddi-xerreten was saying and immediately arose from the fire and went back to their people.

©Harshil Gudka (Unsplash)

Ddi-xerreten looked at the remaining children and said again “O children, sitting here! The fire of your people is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” This time three children arose and quickly made their way back to their people. He looked around again and still there were more children and he said again, “O children sitting here! The fire of your people is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” This time one small child arose and went away to join his people. And still, there were more children and he again said, “O children sitting here! The fire of your people is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” Two more children arose and went away to their people.

©Ban Yido (Unsplash)

Once more he addressed the children and said, “O children sitting here! The fire of your people  is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” Another two children arose and thus went away. Once more he implored the children, “O children sitting here! The fire of your people  is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” Three children arose and went away to their own people. Finally, there were only two children left and Ddi-xerreten said to them, “O children sitting here! The fire of your people is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top of the hill.” The last two children left and went away to their people.

Ddi-xerretten then sat and waited for the lioness to return. Soon the lioness returned from drinking water at the stream. She looked around and saw that all the children had disappeared. She was enraged. In her rage she stammered “Why did the children do this to me? Why are the children not playing here as they should be?” Then she saw a man sitting next to her house and she realised that the man who resembled Ddi-xerreten must be responsible for the children’s disappearance.

©Anna Heupel

In her anger she approached him and demanded to know where the children were. Ddi-xerreten replied,“They are not your children.” The lioness then demanded that he returned the children to her. She then grabbed hold of Ddi-xerreten’s head with her teeth. She cried out in pain, “Oh dear! Oh dear! My teeth” as she did not realise that he’s head was made of stone. He told her once again that the children were not her children. The lioness cursed at him for coming to her house. Ddi-xerreten arose and returned home while the lioness sat and stewed in her anger as she felt that she had been living peacefully with the children and she had loved them.

©Dominik Lange (Unsplash)

I think after reading this story, you might just yearn for a visit to Etosha National Park, and it would certainly be ideal to stay at Etosha Safari Lodge or Etosha Safari Camp. But, this is a story linked to the Echoes in the Dune Exhibition. And there is still a chance to experience glimpses of this exhibition hosted by the Fine Art Gallery in Swakopmund, which ends on 6 October 2019.  Make it a fun trip and stay at The Delight Swakopmund.

©Rogerio and Camila Roca no Mundo

What other interesting Namibia tales have you heard of? Share with us in the comment section below.

Story contributed by Fine Art Gallery in Swakopmund, written by Christine Lamberth