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Hornkranz: 125 years ago, today...

12. avril 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

Namibia’s journey to independence began a long time ago and is paved with painful events. Many of them are commemorated on Namibia’s calendar. One, however, is not well known. It is the massacre that took place at Hornkranz in the Khomas Hochland mountains on 12 April 1893. A 125 ago today, German colonial forces attacked Hendrik Witbooi at his village at Hornkranz, killing eighty people, many of them women and children.

Hornkranz: 125 years ago, today...

Boat tours in the bay of Walvis Bay

06. avril 2018, inke - Tourism, Discover Namibia

The dark glossy shape leaps aboard at the stern of the catamaran and waddles straight past the tourists without batting an eyelid. The marine mammal stops right at the bow and waits to be given fish as if it were the most natural thing in the world. Carol-Ann Möller had warned her passengers in advance to expect Cape fur seals joining them. Namibia’s largest and most important harbour, Walvis Bay, is sheltered by a peninsula. The bay and the lagoon are home to countless marine animals and seabirds. 

Boat tours in the bay of Walvis Bay

How Leopard got his spots

23. février 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

According to African folklore, Leopard stopped sharing his meals and started to hide his kill in trees because Jackal and Hyena weren’t reciprocating his generosity. One of the best remembered fables of the ages is, however, “How the Leopard Got His Spots” in the “Just So Stories” where Rudyard Kipling spelled out the benefits of camouflage. Leopard looked “like a sunflower against a tarred fence” when he entered the forest from the veld until the Ethiopian kindly painted the five-dotted rosettes which cover the leopard’s coat to this day.

How Leopard got his spots

The healing waters of Ai-Ais: The early days

09. février 2018, inke - Tourism, Discover Namibia

At the southern end of the Fish River Canyon, a mineral-rich hot spring encircled by rugged mountains has attracted people for centuries. It was known from the earliest times by the Nama who went there when sick to be healed by the rejuvenating waters. /Ai-/Ais is the Nama word for ‘very hot’. Groundwater heated up in the Earth’s crust rises to the surface at about 60˚C in passages created by the deep fault systems found in the canyon.

The healing waters of Ai-Ais: The early days

Did you know that penguins sometimes should not swim?

02. février 2018, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

Visitors to the coast sometimes find penguins on the beach that seem to be sick and try to put them back into the water. When the little fellows look scruffy and unhappy they are not sick but in moult. A number of these flightless birds are sometimes brought to Swakopmund or Walvis Bay where they eventually make it to Dr Sandra Dantu and in Lüderitz to the rehabilitation centre of the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources.

Did you know that penguins sometimes should not swim?

Mysterious Monument in Aus

26. janvier 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

Aus is situated 125 km east of Lüderitz on the fringe of the Huib Plateau in the Namib Desert. If you make time for a closer look at this little village of 1,200 inhabitants (in 2011) you will discover a memorial stone at the riverbank next to the old railway station from German colonial times. The stone is a good two metres high, but there is no commemorative plaque... In whose honour was this monument erected? 

Mysterious Monument in Aus

Bush pigs: Rarely seen and little known

25. janvier 2018, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

Well-known ornithologist and safari guide Steve Braine worked for the Department of Nature Conservation for many years and was based in the Zambezi Region when it was still called the Caprivi. He says that he has never seen a bush pig anywhere in Namibia. The Ministry of Environment and Tourism has no figures on bush pigs. No pigs were spotted during the game counts in recent years. 

Bush pigs: Rarely seen and little known

Following in the footsteps of Ernst Gries onto Königstein

22. janvier 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

“I am an expert on Prof. Gries, but certainly no Brandberg expert”, Dr Helge Kleifeld, a historian and geographer from Cologne in Germany remarked drily at the end of his three-day expedition to Königstein in the Brandberg Massif on 2 January this year. Accompanied by archaeologist Martina Trognitz and pilot Lukas Gehring he climbed the highest mountain in Namibia to commemorate the centenary of the first ascent by a European. The party who scaled the 2573 m peak on 2 January 1918 consisted of Prof. Ernst August Gries, Reinhard Maack and Georg Schulze.

Following in the footsteps of Ernst Gries onto Königstein

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