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A Museum for Namibia‘s Old Wheelers

Avatar of inke inke - 29. November 2017 - Culture, Discover Namibia


“Perhaps you noticed the screen inside the car, between the driver and the backseat. And there are two rumble seats at the back. Apparently this 1938 Buick Limited Limousine belonged to Sir Herbert Stanley at some stage when he was the Governor of Southern Rhodesia, today’s Zimbabwe”, Peter Breitenstein, the current owner of the Buick, explained at the Bonnets Up Day in September this year (2017). He is a founding member of the Old Wheelers Club Namibia and served as its chairman for 19 years. The two-ton Buick, now all gleaming chrome and as good as new, was a wreck when Breitenstein discovered it in South Africa back in 1993. It took him several years and lots of TLC to restore it to its original beauty and driveable state.

Next to the dark blue Buick Limited Limousine stands a red and black 1947 Buick Super Sedanet which belongs to Breitenstein as well. He also restored it. On Bonnets Up Day, held once a month on a Saturday, club members and visitors display their four-wheeled pride and joy with open bonnets on the grounds of the Old Wheeler Club in Windhoek. It’s an opportunity to talk shop, ask questions and admire the classic cars on show.

On the Sunday prior to the Bonnets Up Day in September, a group of 29 club members took their veterans on wheels for a Breakfast Run to a farm in the Khomashochland Mountains west of Windhoek. Their biggest worry was that in the thin air at 2000 metres above sea level the cars’ radiators might overheat. 

A group of classic car enthusiasts met in Windhoek in 1984 to discuss the possibility of establishing a club. Two years later the Old Wheelers Club of Namibia was formed with 26 members. Since then their number has risen to about 520, of whom 300 are active members who own at least one classic car. Another 25 members live abroad.  

On 15 February 2014 a long-cherished dream came true for the Old Wheelers Club’s committee and members: they were able to take possession of the first clubhouse they owned themselves. Everybody had diligently contributed to this milestone in the club’s history. The chairman, Eric Detering, said at the inauguration that the dream had become a reality thanks to the construction team led by Wolfgang Stehn. The first sod was turned on 26 January 2013 and a year later the unique and inviting, well thought out clubhouse was ready. Various sponsors and benefactors saw to it that the club did not have to take out a loan to cover the total building cost of five million Namibia dollars.      

Now the club is ready to take another step. The clubhouse in Rugby Street east of Eros airport will be joined by a museum for members and other classic car owners to showcase their vehicles and for exhibiting engines, spare parts and any paraphernalia from the bygone days of motoring. A restaurant and bar are already part of the clubhouse. Once the museum is ready, the business hours of the restaurant will be extended. Currently the restaurant and club are open from 16:00-21:00 on Mondays to Thursdays, from 12:00-22:00 on Fridays and from 11:00-15:00 on Saturdays.

The Old Wheelers Club is affiliated to the Land Rover Owners Club, the BMW Motorcycle Club and the Harley Davidson Owners Group.

For more information visit
http://www.oldwheelers.com

info©oldwheelers.com
https://www.facebook.com/OldWheelers/

Dirk Heinrich

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