A false entrance to the Cape penduline tit’s nest - News - Gondwana Collection

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A false entrance to the Cape penduline tit’s nest

Avatar of inke inke - 24. July 2018 - Environment

The Cape Penduline Tit uses one foot to open the entrance to the nest, which is hidden behind a trapdoor above the false entrance. The nest is not only used for breeding but at night serves as a shelter for the whole family. An adult Cape Penduline Tit measures less than 10 cm from the tip of the tail to the tip of the bill and weighs in at 7.5 grams.

Dirk Heinrich

Heavy gusts of wind are relentlessly battering the landscape. Trees and shrubs are blown back and forth for hours. Several metres above the ground an almost white nest dangles from a thin, thorny branch of a buffalo-thorn (Ziziphus mucronata). The nest is some 15 cm high, with a width and depth of about 9 cm. It consists of soft plant material which looks like cotton wool. Crouched inside are three Cape Penduline Tit (Anthoscopus minutus) chicks.

Cape Penduline Tits are among the smallest birds in southern Africa. In sheep farming areas they build their soft, bag-like nests with sheep’s wool. Before entering the nest the bird has to open the entrance spout with one foot. When leaving the nest the bird pushes through the trapdoor which immediately closes shut again.

For more information, please have a look at Namibia Outdoor.

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