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Black-backed Jackal - The Trickster

14. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Like the fox in European folklore, the jackal is often represented in African folk tales as a trickster. Its ability to adapt to changing circumstances and its legendary stealth and cunning have inspired stories about the wily creature that dodges traps and avoids hunters year in year out. The jackal is reputed to be able to obliterate its tracks, feign death and rid itself of fleas by immersing itself in water, only exposing a tuft of sheep’s wool which it holds in its snout.

Black-backed Jackal - The Trickster

Piles of stones a reminder of Haiseb deity

07. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Canyon Village is dedicated to the history and culture of the Nama and Oorlam peoples. Before this Gondwana lodge opened in September 2003, five Namibian artists were engaged to depict scenes from the everyday life of these peoples as it was more than 100 years ago in dozens of murals. The idea was for guests to become acquainted with the people of southern Namibia and to keep alive the past of the Nama that was slowly fading into oblivion. 

Piles of stones a reminder of Haiseb deity

Ringed Blue Cranes offer new insights

06. July 2017, inke - Environment

The Blue Crane, critically endangered in Namibia, occurs exclusively in the Etosha National Park and the Omadhiya lakes, a series of oshanas (seasonally flooded lakes) to the north of the park. To see this rare bird, tourists often visit areas near the Chudop waterhole in the Namutoni area, Salvadora in the Halali area, and recently at Nebrownii, east of Okaukuejo in Namibia’s most famous park.

Ringed Blue Cranes offer new insights

Twyfelfontein - the Fountain of Doubt

30. June 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Long before the Twyfelfontein engravings became a popular tourist destination and received recognition as a world heritage site, the land was visited sporadically by Damara people watering their animals at the trickling spring (or "fontein" as it is called in Afrikaans). It was named Twyfelfontein (doubtful spring) by farmer David Levin who settled on the arid land in the late 1940s in the hope that he could farm sustainably utilising the spring water. 

Twyfelfontein - the Fountain of Doubt

Rarely seen: the wild’s effective but endangered hunters

26. June 2017, inke - Environment

Over the years I have visited Bushmanland many times but never spotted an African wild dog, although every now and then I heard about other people who had seen the multi-coloured canids. This time I am fortunate enough to encounter some of these fascinating animals in the wild. I can hardly believe my eyes: three African wild dogs are chasing a young springbok less than 100 metres away from us!

Rarely seen: the wild’s effective but endangered hunters

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