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A sweet first day at school with a “Zuckertüte”

11. January 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

Today, the German speaking first graders at the Delta School Windhoek tackled their first school day with a Zuckertüte in their arms and a schoolbag on their backs, just like their parents and grandparents many years before them. Not only at this government school but at all schools in the country where German speaking children start their first year, the “Zuckertüte” plays an essential role.

A sweet first day at school with a “Zuckertüte”

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

11. January 2018, inke - Environment

In 2015, the then 27 year old Namibian Götz Neef, a qualified botanist and entomologist, joined the research team of the Okavango Wilderness Project thanks to his professor. During their first expedition they travelled 2414 kilometres from the source of the Cuito in the Central Angolan Highlands, through Namibia, to the end of the waterway, south of the world-famous Okavango Delta in Botswana. 

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

Did you know that giant eagle owls catch francolins?

09. January 2018, inke - Environment

Giant eagle owls, also known as Verreaux's eagle-owl or the milky eagle owl, not only use the old nests of secretary birds or eagles for breeding, but also the top of sociable weaver and hamerkop nests. They raise one chick, sometimes two of them, which stay with their parents until the next breeding season the following year. This owl species is the second-largest in the country.

Did you know that giant eagle owls catch francolins?

Rhino Hunt results in the founding of Henties Bay

05. January 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

Who would have thought that a rhino hunt in 1929 would result in the founding of one of Namibia’s most popular holiday resorts? The story of how Major Hentie van der Merwe discovered a deep valley of sand a few miles south of the Omaruru river mouth was first published on 29 April 1977 by the Brandwag magazine. It was a spot with more than enough fresh water and an abundance of game. Henties Bay was named after this Major. 

Rhino Hunt results in the founding of Henties Bay

Testing the Duster in the Desert

03. January 2018, inke - Gondwana Collection, Tourism

It stands there, silver-coloured, shimmering in the sunlight, a bit broad with a square rear end and that nice “Namibia2Go” logo on its doors. The car’s interior has lots of space for children, dogs and shopping bags, a nice city car. And on top of that it’s all-wheel drive? That is what the offer says. I am tasked to test the Duster in the Kalahari Desert. 

Testing the Duster in the Desert

Gondwana supports international bird counts in Namibia

29. December 2017, inke - Discover Namibia, Environment

Waterbird counts are conducted twice a year at various wetland sites on Namibia’s coast and in the interior as part of the International Waterbird Census (IWC). The numbers gathered during a count ultimately end up on the desk of Holger Kolberg, a nature conservation official with the research department of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, who is also Namibia’s IWC coordinator. The IWC is based in the Netherlands and operates in more than 100 countries.

Gondwana supports international bird counts in Namibia

Ship wrecks – reminder of ancient times

26. December 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Many people worldwide are fascinated by ship wrecks. It is like directly touching history. The shipping route from Europe to the Cape of Good Hope along Africa’s southern most point to India and Asia – discovered some 500 years ago – brought a lot of traffic. Many sailing ships of different nations travelled this route past Namibia. Accidents happened, stormy seas and hash winds led to shipwrecks. 

Ship wrecks – reminder of ancient times

In the hearth: The beloved fireplace of yesteryear

23. December 2017, inke - Culture

Memories have unusual origins. My love for fireplaces began when I was fourteen years old. I memorise an image that has remained with me throughout my life and that ignited my fascination for fireplaces. Since that time, regardless of where I am in southern Africa or in Europe, I stop whenever I see ruins of an old fireplace. It is always symbolic to me that the rest of the house has crumbled away to time, yet these sturdy fireplaces and their chimneys remain standing.

In the hearth: The beloved fireplace of yesteryear

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