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Oranges for sale

30. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Gondwana started construction on Canyon Lodge, their first, east of the Fish River Canyon. Bank funding had been secured in principle, with personal homes put up as collateral. The founders were on site day and night, leaving no time to travel to Windhoek to see their families, or the bank manager. When the anticipated phone call came from the bank, requesting a meeting with the new MD Manni Goldbeck to confirm funding, pressure instantly mounted. Having already paid his labourers for the week’s work, Manni found himself alone on site with his Kombi and not a penny in his pocket and only a few drops in the petrol tank.

Oranges for sale

Astucious strategist – the “Black Napoleon”

23. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

It happened only once in the history of the German Empire that British security forces were decorated with a German military medal, the South West Africa Commemorative Medal with the bar “Kalahari 1907”. This medal was awarded during the Herero and Nama uprising from 1904 to 1908. The “Kalahari 1907” clasp refers to one particular event which triggered cooperation between the authorities in German South West Africa and British police and soldiers stationed in the Cape Colony. 

Astucious strategist – the “Black Napoleon”

Burchell’s zebra - When the stripes become blurred

16. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Many years ago a tourist from South Africa told nature conservation officials in the Etosha National Park that instead of Blacky he had spotted “die ander merrie” (the other mare). Blacky was almost completely black and at that stage probably the best known plains zebra in the park. But there was another zebra whose black stripes were blurred, except for the usual white underbelly and parts of the legs. After the excited visitor from the Transvaal had reported his sighting of the “ander merrie”, this second mare was named Annemarie because the English-speaking nature conservation official was a little lost with Afrikaans.

Burchell’s zebra - When the stripes become blurred

Tribute to Koos van Ellinckhuijzen (1942 to 2016)

16. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Enduring Imagination. Koos van Ellinckhuijzen, artist, sculptor, musician, poet, skydiver, amateur astronomer, writer, philosopher, visionary, outsider, invested with a free spirit fired by genius, died on September 5th, aged 73. He explained his approach to his work as interweaving art with science, and making the abstract real: “Art is in essence the artificial. You must paint with something in mind that does not yet exist.” His art was marvelous work of the imagination that grew out of the vast expanse of his boiling mind.

Tribute to Koos van Ellinckhuijzen (1942 to 2016)

Sausage tree - A bit of African magic

09. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

If you have ever seen a sausage tree you probably will not forget it. This robust medium to large tree with a rounded crown has striking pendulous burgundy coloured flowers, growing in sprays that hang downward, reminiscent of orchids. The large opulent blooms have velvet inners and long pollen-bearing stamens, thought to be pollinated by fruit bats. If the tree is not in bloom to dazzle you, then the enormous brown-grey gourd-like fruit hanging from the branches definitely will.

Sausage tree - A bit of African magic

Troop Exercises under red Flag

02. September 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Dust whirls up as the men march forward, thundering across the sandy field. Orders ring out back and forth, riders decorated with medals file past on their horses. On one side of the field women line up in a long double row. The men are dressed in khaki uniforms, the women wear voluminous black and red Victorian-style dresses and a red head-garb resembling the horns of cattle.The ceremonial procession of the Hereros in Okahandja, known as Herero Day and also as Red Flag Day, takes place every year on a Sunday at the end of August.

Troop Exercises under red Flag

Brukkaros - A Crater caused by an Explosion

19. August 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Many believe that the enormous crater of Brukkaros west of the national road between Mariental and Keetmanshoop is an extinct volcano. Geologists initially shared this opinion because of the mountain’s external shape. It is 1,603 metres high, rising 600 metres above the plain, and the shape of the slope is typical of a volcano. But the rock types that are usually found in the vicinity of fire-spitting mountains are absent around Brukkaros. Only when geologists studied the rocks in and around the crater thoroughly was the secret of the formation of Brukkaros finally unravelled.

Brukkaros - A Crater caused by an Explosion

The Quiver Tree - Symbol of the South

12. August 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

As guests explore the Canyon Village they will come across clusters of curiously beautiful quiver trees along the way, thanks to a project launched by the Gondwana Collection that aims to preserve these extraordinary but rapidly declining trees. The quiver tree is one of Namibia’s national plants and is widely regarded as a symbol of the south. The fascinating trees were named by Simon van der Stel in 1685 after he was told that the San (Bushmen) used the branches to make quivers for their arrows. 

The Quiver Tree - Symbol of the South

Sand fleas and wooden huts - the beginnings of Swakopmund

05. August 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

Swakopmund was created out of necessity because the German colony urgently needed a harbour. The bay 30 kilometres to the south, Walvis Bay, was already in British possession when South West Africa was declared a protectorate of Imperial Germany. In 1892 the Reichskommissar (commissioner) of the German colony, Curt von François, began searching the central part of the coastline for a site suitable for a harbour.  

Sand fleas and wooden huts - the beginnings of Swakopmund

Dune Lark - Namibia’s only truly endemic Bird

29. July 2016, inke - Discover Namibia

The Dune Lark is one of the most desert-adapted birds in the world. It lives on sparsely vegetated sand dunes in the Namib. It does not drink water and it feeds on whatever seeds and insects it can find. It has a number of interesting behaviour patterns that help it survive in the intense heat and aridity of the Namib sand dunes. It searches for food mainly in the morning and late afternoon, running rapidly over the bare sand between patches of vegetation. The hotter it gets, the longer are the bird’s strides. 

Dune Lark - Namibia’s only truly endemic Bird

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