News

Gondwana's Newsroom

Filtered by category Discover Namibia Reset filter

Matchball on top of Brukkaros

25. September 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

This is where solitude lives. After several hours of driving to the foot of the volcano-shaped mountain and another two hours of climbing we have reached our destination: the south-western crater rim of Brukkaros, north of Keetmanshoop. We are 600 metres above the rest of the world, surrounded by total wilderness. But what on earth is this? Two steel tubes, set in a concrete base, protrude waist high from the ground. They are about nine metres apart. No doubt, this is a tennis court. But who, may I ask, plays tennis on the crater rim of Brukkaros?

Matchball on top of Brukkaros

The Battle of Waterberg

14. August 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Hereros and Germans had been at war for seven months in the former colony of German South West Africa on 11 August 1904. Led by paramount chief Samuel Maharero the main force of the Hereros was concentrated at the southeastern flank of Waterberg Mountain. Historians believe that the Herero force was up to 3000 men strong. German general Lothar von Trotha had a force of 2500 men at his disposal (Tröndle 2012). He planned to encircle the Hereros and inflict a crushing defeat.

 

The Battle of Waterberg

Wild Horses - Embodying the wild Spirit of Namibia

24. July 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

The Namib horses have survived in the desert in the south-western reaches of Namibia for close on a century. Like wild horses worldwide these resilient horses originated from domestic stock. And like all wild horses they fill our hearts and feed our dreams. Several theories have been put forward over the years to account for their origin, but it is most likely that they are the descendants of horses belonging to the Union forces stationed at Garub during WWI and of the horses from the Kubub stud farm, 35 km south-east of Garub.

Wild Horses - Embodying the wild Spirit of Namibia

The Fountain of Doubt

03. July 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Long before the Twyfelfontein engravings became a popular tourist destination and received recognition as a world heritage site, the land was visited sporadically by Damara people watering their animals at the trickling spring. It was named Twyfelfontein (‘doubtful spring’) by the farmer, David Levin, who settled on the arid land in the late 1940s with the hope that the spring’s water could sustain them.

The Fountain of Doubt

Threads of Love

19. June 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Agnes Hill’s grave at Holoog was always a mystery; the words ‘Peace Perfect Peace’ inscribed on the simple black dolomite headstone overlooking the dry, rocky land. Mysteries often lie buried in mounds of historical facts and discovering the missing pieces that are the sinew of family history is like finding shining nuggets of gold. Such a poignant story as this touches chords deep within, the parts of us that reach for threads of love that appear and disappear in our lifespan in fleeting moments of chance and destiny. 

Threads of Love

The ways of Private AP Schottland

29. May 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

An airmail letter from London addressed to RHA Schneider, Swakopmund, SWA, was duly delivered to the Schneider family in December 1952. The addressee, Reinhard Schneider, was however seriously ill. His son Heiner (Schneider-Waterberg) did not know the sender’s name, which he made out as A Scotland, and put the letter into the “pending” tray. Years later, when he researched the history of his family’s farm Okosongomingo, he came upon the name AP Scotland again in files that were more than 30 years old. 

The ways of Private AP Schottland

Wanted dead or alive

01. May 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Thirty years after the death of the notorious Nhadiep, a shiver of fear still runs through southern Namibia whenever his name is mentioned and people are quick to say: “Meneer, hou op van Nhadiep te praat” (Sir, stop talking about Nhadiep). They grew up frightened into obedience by their parents’ threats that the South’s most feared man would come after them.

Wanted dead or alive

The air disaster at Ondekaremba

24. April 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

The air disaster at Ondekaremba April 20th 1968 was a moonless, starlit evening with no wind. Flight SA 228 was ready for take-off from JG Strijdom airport (now Hosea Kutako) 45 kilometres east of Windhoek. Relatives and friends of the 46 passengers who had recently boarded the plane were standing on the terrace of the airport building. They saw the Pretoria speed away on the runway, take off and start to climb. Then, unspeakable horror: the plane levelled off, rapidly lost height and hit the ground. A fiery glow lit up the night. Fifty seconds had passed since take-off. 

The air disaster at Ondekaremba

Stay up-to-date with our monthly 'Gondwana Tracks' Newsletter Sign up Today