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Did you know that the West coast seabream is protandrous?

05. October 2017, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

One of the few line-fish species sought after by anglers on our coast, is the west coast seabream (Lithognathus aureti), better known as Steenbras. The bigger the fish the better, but that had tremendous effects on the species. In the 90s Dr Hannes Holtzhausen, researcher at the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, found out that the west coast seabream is one of the few species which is protandrous. 

Did you know that the West coast seabream is protandrous?

Welwitschia mirabilis - A Botanical Wonder

29. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Home to the ancient Namib Desert, Namibia is known for the unusual and the mysterious. Austrian naturalist and botanist, Friedrich Welwitsch was awe-struck when on 3 September 1859 whilst in southern Angola he came across a plant unlike any he had previously seen. So overcome by his find, he is said to have fallen to his knees and stared. He noted: “... I am convinced that I saw the most beautiful and magnificent botanical wonder that tropical southern Africa can present.” 

Welwitschia mirabilis - A Botanical Wonder

Tommy’s Living Desert Tours – education, respect & a whole lot of fun!

26. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia, Tourism

A highlight of a visit to Swakopmund is a guided 4x4 trip into the Namib dunes with someone who is familiar with the ancient desert and its creatures. An area that looks barren to the untrained eye soon becomes home to an array of intriguing creatures. Tommy Collard will also ensure that you have a good laugh along the way.

Tommy’s Living Desert Tours – education, respect & a whole lot of fun!

Bush crickets - the creeps or fascination?

22. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia, Environment

In some years thousands of armoured bush crickets are run over on Namibia’s arterial roads at the end of the rainy season, when winter is on its way. The spiky, almost black insects are about three centimetres long and occur only during the summer months. One of their defence mechanisms is to squirt their yellow blood. Many people find them disgusting. Colloquially this cricket is referred to as dickpens (Afrikaans for fat stomach).

Bush crickets - the creeps or fascination?

Tropic of Capricorn - 23˚ south

21. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

You may have noticed signboards indicating the Tropic of Capricorn alongside the road south of Rehoboth and the Kuiseb Pass. Actually, in Namibia the Tropic of Capricorn cuts across the Erongo, Khomas and Omaheke regions! The signs have become more colourful over time as stickers are continually added by travellers who have stopped to acknowledge 23˚ south. But what is 23˚ south?

Tropic of Capricorn - 23˚ south

A memorable event: Helmut Kohl visited Namibia 22 years ago

14. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

So far, Helmut Kohl is the only German chancellor who has visited Namibia. He arrived for a working visit on 14 September 1995 and was greeted at Windhoek’s Hosea Kutako Airport by President Hage Gottlieb Geingob who was the Prime Minister at that time. From the airport Kohl proceeded directly to the old State House, a building from the German colonial era, for a meeting with Sam Nujoma, Namibia’s first president.

A memorable event: Helmut Kohl visited Namibia 22 years ago

Postal runner - A Postage Stamp for a Gravestone

08. September 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Now would actually be a good time to light a fire and spend the night in the bush, he thinks. However, Omaruru isn’t much further from here and he can find his way easily in the dark. He is also spurred on by ambition. The journey to Walvis Bay has taken him less than three weeks, which is really fast but quite normal for him. Wouldn’t they be amazed then, if he returned tonight? And also terribly pleased about this particularly heavy bag of letters they always awaited so eagerly? Ignoring the heavy load on his shoulder he continues his trot through the bush. There! Isn’t that the glow of a fire ahead of him?

Postal runner - A Postage Stamp for a Gravestone

Did you know that snakes eat other snakes?

05. September 2017, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

In the midst of a dense bush an Oates’ bird snake (Thelotornis capensis oatesi) is holding on to a Leopard whip snake (Psammophis leopardinus). The prey, gripped behind its head, finds itself lodged askew in the far back of the bird snake’s mouth. Bird snakes usually eat lizards, chameleons and frogs. They rarely catch birds and other snakes. Cobras in particular are known for eating other snakes.

Did you know that snakes eat other snakes?

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