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Wetland bird counts at Gondwana lodges in north-eastern Namibia

23. March 2018, inke - Environment

Regular wetland bird counts have been conducted in Namibia twice a year since 1992. Birds are good indicators of wetland “health” and as a signatory to the Convention on Wetlands (the Ramsar Convention) Namibia has an obligation to monitor the condition of all wetlands within the country’s borders. The Gondwana Collection extended an invitation to conduct counts at their four lodges in north-eastern Namibia.

Wetland bird counts at Gondwana lodges in north-eastern Namibia

Crocodile lurks on the Skeleton Coast

19. March 2018, inke - Environment

The upper part of the massive bleached skull rests on the waves formed by the fine sand which the wind incessantly moves around the plain. Barely one hundred metres away the Atlantic Ocean crashes onto the beach. Nobody will ever know when the crocodile came ashore at this particular spot of the Skeleton Coast. It will also remain a mystery why the huge reptile crawled onto the beach right here, seven kilometres south of the Kunene River’s mouth, and perished. 

Crocodile lurks on the Skeleton Coast

Namib Desert Lodge – Finalist of the 2018 Responsible Tourism Awards

28. February 2018, inke - Gondwana Collection, Environment

It is the third year in a row that a property of the Gondwana Collection has reached the final of the Responsible Tourism Awards. In 2018, the Namib Desert Lodge is competing for the prestigious award. The other two finalists in the Accommodation Establishment category are Grootberg Lodge and Damaraland Camp. In the Tour Operators category, which includes shuttles, car rentals and the like, the three finalists are Abenteuer Afrika Reisen, Wild Dog Safaris and Ultimate Safaris. 

Namib Desert Lodge – Finalist of the 2018 Responsible Tourism Awards

The merit of plastic tags and camera traps

22. February 2018, inke - Environment

A camera trap at a waterhole on Uli Trümper’s farm Safari captured a lappet-faced vulture together with a black-backed jackal on 29 January this year. The clearly visible plastic tag on the vulture revealed that the bird was ringed about nine years ago. Pictures taken by other camera traps also prove that the vulture was successfully rehabilitated and that it is in good condition. 

The merit of plastic tags and camera traps

Did you know that a certain assassin bug feeds only on millipedes?

19. February 2018, inke - Environment

After good rains a huge number of insects and other animals appear. Moths, butterflies, beetle and, well known to Namibians, millipedes are suddenly all over. Some millipedes are up to 20 cm long and more. Hundreds are killed on our roads when they try to cross. Their hard bodies seem to be a very good protection and as defence they can even secrete liquids and gases which deter most enemies. But there is one predator who has specialised in millipedes and he appears after the rains too: the millipede assassin. 

Did you know that a certain assassin bug feeds only on millipedes?

Dragonflies and Damselflies: Fast flying jewels

15. February 2018, inke - Environment

Usually they occur close to water but often they suddenly appear in dry and arid places. They are fast flying colourful insects, only a few centimetres long. They can zigzag through the air, they can hover, they can fly backwards and they can land precisely on the tip of a twig or on the ground.Their bright colours are just as amazing as the unique patterns on their long segmented abdomen. Namibia has almost 130 species of dragonflies and damselflies.

Dragonflies and Damselflies: Fast flying jewels

The many faces of the red-billed quelea

12. February 2018, inke - Environment

They often appear in huge flocks and descend on waterholes like a cloud. In their thousands they invade fields and destroy harvests – from Senegal across to Ethiopia and down to southern Africa, where vast swarms are on the move in search of food and for nesting. They are the largest population of a single bird species on the planet. Experts estimate their numbers at 1500 billion birds after a breeding season. We are talking about the red-billed quelea. 

The many faces of the red-billed quelea

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