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The many faces of the red-billed quelea

12. February 2018, inke - Environment

They often appear in huge flocks and descend on waterholes like a cloud. In their thousands they invade fields and destroy harvests – from Senegal across to Ethiopia and down to southern Africa, where vast swarms are on the move in search of food and for nesting. They are the largest population of a single bird species on the planet. Experts estimate their numbers at 1500 billion birds after a breeding season. We are talking about the red-billed quelea. 

The many faces of the red-billed quelea

Cradle of Animalia lies in southern Namibia

08. February 2018, inke - Environment

The discovery of over 500 million year old small fossils in southern Namibia, are today supporting scientific research of living organisms that dwelled on mega-continents like Gondwana, Pangea and Rodinia. Namibia’s southern mountain ranges near Aus provide fascinating fossil finds – witness to dramatic happenings like the Cambrian Fauna Explosion eons ago. Renowned international scientists are currently researching these fossils. Would you like to know more? Read on.

Cradle of Animalia lies in southern Namibia

Large and unusual visitors at our shores

07. February 2018, inke - Environment

Something large and ungainly was lying just above the high-water mark on a beach in Skeleton National Park. Some vehicles had driven past, probably because the brown lump looked like one of the many tree trunks that get deposited on the beaches. But then the ‘trunk’ turned out to be a young bull southern elephant seal. The bulky marine mammal seemed unperturbed by the people around him.

Large and unusual visitors at our shores

Did you know that penguins sometimes should not swim?

02. February 2018, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

Visitors to the coast sometimes find penguins on the beach that seem to be sick and try to put them back into the water. When the little fellows look scruffy and unhappy they are not sick but in moult. A number of these flightless birds are sometimes brought to Swakopmund or Walvis Bay where they eventually make it to Dr Sandra Dantu and in Lüderitz to the rehabilitation centre of the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources.

Did you know that penguins sometimes should not swim?

Bush pigs: Rarely seen and little known

25. January 2018, inke - Environment, Discover Namibia

Well-known ornithologist and safari guide Steve Braine worked for the Department of Nature Conservation for many years and was based in the Zambezi Region when it was still called the Caprivi. He says that he has never seen a bush pig anywhere in Namibia. The Ministry of Environment and Tourism has no figures on bush pigs. No pigs were spotted during the game counts in recent years. 

Bush pigs: Rarely seen and little known

Detector dog Azaro is a master of his trade

17. January 2018, inke - Environment

It’s a scorching day in Etosha National Park. Azaro, a Belgian Shepherd dog, is on duty in the parched landscape. He is about to pass a sizable dense bush when he suddenly pauses for a moment, sniffs the air and then crawls underneath the bush to the other side. There he barks and sits. A small piece of raw ivory is lying between the dry leaves. Dog handler Bernd Brell praises the faithful four-legged detector dog and rewards him with a ball to play with.

Detector dog Azaro is a master of his trade

The African openbill feeds on snails and mussels

16. January 2018, inke - Environment

The openbill, a species of stork almost sixty centimetres tall, delicately wades through the shallow water. When it scoops up a sea snail it deftly pulls the animal out of its hard shell. If a mussel cannot be cracked, the openbill drops it in a sunny spot on the riverbank where it will open eventually. Mussels are always deposited in the same spot. Currently such accumulations are found at the Chobe River Camp in the eastern parts of the Zambezi Region where openbills take advantage of the Chobe River’s low water level to forage for their favourite food. 

The African openbill feeds on snails and mussels

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

11. January 2018, inke - Environment

In 2015, the then 27 year old Namibian Götz Neef, a qualified botanist and entomologist, joined the research team of the Okavango Wilderness Project thanks to his professor. During their first expedition they travelled 2414 kilometres from the source of the Cuito in the Central Angolan Highlands, through Namibia, to the end of the waterway, south of the world-famous Okavango Delta in Botswana. 

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

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