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Detector dog Azaro is a master of his trade

17. January 2018, inke - Environment

It’s a scorching day in Etosha National Park. Azaro, a Belgian Shepherd dog, is on duty in the parched landscape. He is about to pass a sizable dense bush when he suddenly pauses for a moment, sniffs the air and then crawls underneath the bush to the other side. There he barks and sits. A small piece of raw ivory is lying between the dry leaves. Dog handler Bernd Brell praises the faithful four-legged detector dog and rewards him with a ball to play with.

Detector dog Azaro is a master of his trade

The African openbill feeds on snails and mussels

16. January 2018, inke - Environment

The openbill, a species of stork almost sixty centimetres tall, delicately wades through the shallow water. When it scoops up a sea snail it deftly pulls the animal out of its hard shell. If a mussel cannot be cracked, the openbill drops it in a sunny spot on the riverbank where it will open eventually. Mussels are always deposited in the same spot. Currently such accumulations are found at the Chobe River Camp in the eastern parts of the Zambezi Region where openbills take advantage of the Chobe River’s low water level to forage for their favourite food. 

The African openbill feeds on snails and mussels

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

11. January 2018, inke - Environment

In 2015, the then 27 year old Namibian Götz Neef, a qualified botanist and entomologist, joined the research team of the Okavango Wilderness Project thanks to his professor. During their first expedition they travelled 2414 kilometres from the source of the Cuito in the Central Angolan Highlands, through Namibia, to the end of the waterway, south of the world-famous Okavango Delta in Botswana. 

Okavango Wilderness Project: Over 4500km in a Mokoro, across three countries

Did you know that giant eagle owls catch francolins?

09. January 2018, inke - Environment

Giant eagle owls, also known as Verreaux's eagle-owl or the milky eagle owl, not only use the old nests of secretary birds or eagles for breeding, but also the top of sociable weaver and hamerkop nests. They raise one chick, sometimes two of them, which stay with their parents until the next breeding season the following year. This owl species is the second-largest in the country.

Did you know that giant eagle owls catch francolins?

Gondwana supports international bird counts in Namibia

29. December 2017, inke - Discover Namibia, Environment

Waterbird counts are conducted twice a year at various wetland sites on Namibia’s coast and in the interior as part of the International Waterbird Census (IWC). The numbers gathered during a count ultimately end up on the desk of Holger Kolberg, a nature conservation official with the research department of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, who is also Namibia’s IWC coordinator. The IWC is based in the Netherlands and operates in more than 100 countries.

Gondwana supports international bird counts in Namibia

Watch out for chicks – stay on the roads

18. December 2017, inke - Environment, Tourism

The coastal areas that people flock to in droves at this time of the year are the habitat of the endangered Damara tern. And the breeding season of these small seabirds and other plover species, some of which are also threatened, happens to coincide with Namibia’s main holiday season in December and January. Several national parks cover the entire coast of Namibia and certain rules have to be obeyed. Far too many visitors, however, still ignore them.

Watch out for chicks – stay on the roads

Nearly 50 percent of full capacity in Namibia’s dams

22. November 2017, inke - Weather, Environment

Although the first good rains occurred in the central and northern parts of Namibia in the last few weeks, the only rivers that have been flowing were in the northwest of Namibia. No inflow has been reported into the major dams in the central part of the country. The water in the three dams, which supply drinking water for Windhoek and the surrounding area, is currently nearly 50 percent of the full capacity. Windhoek´s residents are supposed to save at least 5% of their normal consumption.

Nearly 50 percent of full capacity in Namibia’s dams

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