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MET considers measures to safeguard the wild horses

29. November 2018, inke - Environment

The Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism MET has responded to recent appeals to secure the survival of the wild horses of the Namib. In a press release published on 26 November 2018, they acknowledged that the drought of the five past years and the predation by a pack of spotted hyenas brought the wild horses population on the brink of extinction.

MET considers measures to safeguard the wild horses

Second time’s a charm – Gondwana enters teams for the 2018 Nedbank Desert Dash

29. November 2018, inke - Gondwana Collection, Sport

It is not a surprise that Gondwana Collection is on this mountain biking roller-coaster for the second time, with two social and two competitive teams entered. Furthermore, Gondwana looks forward to welcoming cyclists at the Langer Heinrich water point for a quick stop, drink and snack.   

Second time’s a charm – Gondwana enters teams for the 2018 Nedbank Desert Dash

Tadpole shrimps in Namibia’s puddles

27. November 2018, inke - Environment

The eggs of tadpole shrimps, or triops, can survive in the dusty soil of arid areas for years. The young shrimps hatch when heavy rain showers leave pools of water which do not dry out within a few days. These living fossils have inhabited the earth for more than 250 million years. They are a genus of small crustaceans in the order Notostraca. According to the Namibia Biodiversity Database, only two species are known in Namibia: Triops cancriformis, the tadpole shrimp, and Triops granarius.

Tadpole shrimps in Namibia’s puddles

Small birds of prey in Namibia’s cities

20. November 2018, inke - Environment

Especially in drought years, many species of birds still find food in towns and settlements. The green oases provide shelter, food and water. Countless feeding stations, set up by bird lovers in the cities, offer a constant supply of food. Seed-eaters and fruit-eaters can survive in the gardens of the cities. Some birds remain in the man-made habitats, others return to the wild as soon as conditions improve there.

Small birds of prey in Namibia’s cities

THE WILD HORSES OF THE NAMIB ARE ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION - IMMEDIATE ACTION IS CALLED FOR!

19. November 2018, inke - Environment

The last five years have been harsh for the wild horses of the Namib, with severe drought and predation by a pack of spotted hyenas, which moved into the area in 2013. Numbers have plummeted dramatically from around 300 to a mere 80 horses. The lives of the remaining horses are still in immediate danger.

THE WILD HORSES OF THE NAMIB ARE ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION - IMMEDIATE ACTION IS CALLED FOR!

150 years ago, a unique group of people braved the unknown

16. November 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

The Basters, a group who evolved from relationships between Khoisan women and Trek-Boers, had established settlements south of the Orange River in the early parts of the 19th century. Constant attacks by local Khoisan tribes, and the search for better grazing and water, were a threat to their livelihoods. They decided to leave the Cape colony and moved northwards, reaching the Orange River on 16 November 1868. Two years later the first Baster families arrived at their new home: Rehoboth.

150 years ago, a unique group of people braved the unknown

Mysterious furthest game migration in Africa

06. November 2018, inke - Environment

It is more than 500 kilometres for the round-trip from the Chobe floodplains in Namibia to Nxai Pan in the Nxai Pan National Park in Botswana. Thanks to satellite tracking devices this migration route of Burchell's zebra, popularly called plains zebra, has been known for several years now. Previously, researchers and conservationists always wondered where the zebra population of up to 3000 animals migrated to in the rainy season, when only a few Burchell's zebra remain on the shallow banks of the Chobe.

Mysterious furthest game migration in Africa

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