20 / News - Gondwana Collection

News

Gondwana's Newsroom

Namibian economics to the point – August 2018

31. August 2018, inke - Economics

Namibia hosted the annual summit of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) this month. Namibia and Germany have signed a new N$2 billion (about 135 million Euros) cooperation agreement. Petrol and diesel prices increased by 25 cents a litre. The Director-General of the international Labour Organisation, Guy Riders visited Namibia. President Hage Geingob travelled to Indonesia and China at the end of August.  

Namibian economics to the point – August 2018

680 bird species in Namibia

30. August 2018, inke - Environment

According to the latest statistics no less than 680 different bird species are found in Namibia. Four of them were introduced to southern Africa and acclimatised well to Namibia and the neighbouring countries. Sixteen bird species are endemic. Fifty-one of the 680 bird species are threatened with extinction and another 27 species are endangered. 

680 bird species in Namibia

Otoliths help to determine fish species and age

28. August 2018, inke - Environment

Stones in the head of a fish – is that possible? Some anglers are aware of stones, or otoliths, in the head of the Madagascar meagre, but it is not generally known that ear-stones, most of them tiny, are found in the skull of all fish. Ear-stones, according to scientists, probably help fish to keep their balance. Otoliths are used to find out what Cape fur seals eat on our coast. 

Otoliths help to determine fish species and age

After a rain shower: The desert at Lüderitzbucht is alive

22. August 2018, inke - Environment

It is three months now since a heavy shower of over 50 mm came down in and around Lüderitz on May 17th. It revived many flowers that had not bloomed for years, or even worn leaves. Seeds which had slumbered in the parched soil for ages, awakened to life. The greenery and the colours are not short-lived, however: delicate pink blossoms are still to be admired, lush green stands out against the greys and browns of the desert floor, large patches turn yellow and insects are out and about everywhere.

After a rain shower: The desert at Lüderitzbucht is alive

Pearl-spotted owlet rescued - the story of 5H63061

21. August 2018, inke - Environment

In the middle of May a Windhoek resident called to tell me that her father-in-law had brought an injured pearl-spotted owlet with a ringed leg to her house. He had picked it up from a busy road in Klein Windhoek earlier that morning. She asked if I wanted to care for the owlet. When I brought the small bird home I noticed that I had actually ringed it myself. Owlet number 5H63061 had probably been hit by a vehicle.

Pearl-spotted owlet rescued - the story of 5H63061

Thonningii, home to artisan wine in the Otavi Valley

17. August 2018, inke - Tourism, Discover Namibia

The maize triangle of Otavi, Grootfontein and Tsumeb is often bypassed en route to the northern and north-eastern regions. We entered the heart of the triangle recently and made a pleasant stop to visit the family-owned winery. The Thonningii cellar’s ethos is to keep their production as close to nature as possible, creating wines that express the character of the Otavi mountain valley.

Thonningii, home to artisan wine in the Otavi Valley

The omnivorous Marabou Stork: old man in a tailcoat

14. August 2018, inke - Environment

Many people perceive the Marabou Stork as ugly or describe it as an old man wearing a tailcoat. Some call it the “undertaker bird”. The Marabou is a large member of the stork family, just under 1.5 metres tall. Since they are highly effective scavengers these storks are very useful to people. Marabou Storks are classified as “possibly endangered” in Namibia. 

The omnivorous Marabou Stork: old man in a tailcoat

Walvis Bay port: new plans for 2025

10. August 2018, inke - Discover Namibia, Economics

Namibia is on an industrialisation drive and aims to become an international logistics hub for Southern Africa by 2025. The port of Walvis Bay is one of the key elements within these ambitious plans. A new container terminal of 40 hectares is currently constructed and will start operations in early 2019. A brand-new port is on the drawing cards and this goes hand in hand with a huge industrial park planned in close proximity.

Walvis Bay port: new plans for 2025

The Topnaars - forgotten people of Walvis Bay

09. August 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

At first sight, the shifting sand dunes of the Namib Desert near Walvis Bay appear hostile with scant vegetation and little to survive on. Yet a river forms their northern border and carries water after good rains inland. The Kuiseb River has also been inhabited by people for many centuries – namely, the Topnaars. They are of Khoi-San origin and are believed be one of seven Nama-speaking tribal groups.

The Topnaars - forgotten people of Walvis Bay

Stay up-to-date with our monthly 'Gondwana Tracks' Newsletter Sign up Today