Gondwana's Newsroom

Donkey carts: The 4x4s of rural Namibia

02. October 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Although you may think that minibus taxis, buses and bakkies are the modern means of transport in an ever-expanding Africa, on the dusty roads of the Namibian interior, far from crowded cities, the donkey cart is one of the quintessential Namibian forms of transport. The many gravel roads that bisect rural Namibia are arteries in the vast country, ideal for this transport of old. Donkey carts convey people from village to village, to wells and clinics, and transport children to school. 

Donkey carts: The 4x4s of rural Namibia

Matchball on top of Brukkaros

25. September 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

This is where solitude lives. After several hours of driving to the foot of the volcano-shaped mountain and another two hours of climbing we have reached our destination: the south-western crater rim of Brukkaros, north of Keetmanshoop. We are 600 metres above the rest of the world, surrounded by total wilderness. But what on earth is this? Two steel tubes, set in a concrete base, protrude waist high from the ground. They are about nine metres apart. No doubt, this is a tennis court. But who, may I ask, plays tennis on the crater rim of Brukkaros?

Matchball on top of Brukkaros

Gondwana furthers its commitment to hospitality excellence

14. August 2015, inke - Gondwana Collection

Gondwana Collection has officially launched their new Training Academy which will open its doors at the Kalahari Farmhouse in Stampriet in January 2017. The lodge group’s new hospitality training and leadership development programme aims to provide service excellence, promoting Namibia as a top African tourist destination.

Gondwana furthers its commitment to hospitality excellence

The Battle of Waterberg

14. August 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Hereros and Germans had been at war for seven months in the former colony of German South West Africa on 11 August 1904. Led by paramount chief Samuel Maharero the main force of the Hereros was concentrated at the southeastern flank of Waterberg Mountain. Historians believe that the Herero force was up to 3000 men strong. German general Lothar von Trotha had a force of 2500 men at his disposal (Tröndle 2012). He planned to encircle the Hereros and inflict a crushing defeat.

 

The Battle of Waterberg

Jam sessions create awareness of service excellence

12. August 2015, inke - Gondwana Collection

As part of the initiative “The Power of One Voice” the Canadian musician and speaker, Dave Carroll, has been on tour in Namibia with Gondwana Collection (one of the event sponsors) from 6 to 12 August to promote his service delivery message and to promote his travels through some of Namibia’s tourist highlights for people around the world who have been following his trip online. 

Jam sessions create awareness of service excellence

Wild Horses - Embodying the wild Spirit of Namibia

24. July 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

The Namib horses have survived in the desert in the south-western reaches of Namibia for close on a century. Like wild horses worldwide these resilient horses originated from domestic stock. And like all wild horses they fill our hearts and feed our dreams. Several theories have been put forward over the years to account for their origin, but it is most likely that they are the descendants of horses belonging to the Union forces stationed at Garub during WWI and of the horses from the Kubub stud farm, 35 km south-east of Garub.

Wild Horses - Embodying the wild Spirit of Namibia

Gondwana videos by EES – a gorgeous feast for the eyes!

10. July 2015, inke - Gondwana Collection

Visit the Gondwana YouTube Channel and you won’t stop marvelling: breath-taking landscapes and leading actors who in real life work at the respective lodges but excel at telling their story. EES, aka Eric Sell produced the video clips of the Gondwana lodges together with his second cameraman, Manfred Werner. The result is a gorgeous feast for the eyes.

Gondwana videos by EES – a gorgeous feast for the eyes!

The Fountain of Doubt

03. July 2015, inke - Discover Namibia

Long before the Twyfelfontein engravings became a popular tourist destination and received recognition as a world heritage site, the land was visited sporadically by Damara people watering their animals at the trickling spring. It was named Twyfelfontein (‘doubtful spring’) by the farmer, David Levin, who settled on the arid land in the late 1940s with the hope that the spring’s water could sustain them.

The Fountain of Doubt

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