3 / News - Gondwana Collection

News

Gondwana's Newsroom

Namibia’s first Afrikaans school was in Kub

26. October 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

Kub is a small settlement 25 km west of Kalkrand in southern Namibia. At the turn of the 20th century, during German colonial times, Kub was a flourishing little place. Since the Afrikaans families did not want to send their children to the German school in Gibeon but wanted them to be taught in their mother tongue, Frans de Villiers Smeer of Mariental and Hendrik Smit of Swartmodder contacted the Nederlandsch-Zuid-Afrikaansche-Vereniging and secured the services of 30-year-old Dutchman Albertus Kooij.

Namibia’s first Afrikaans school was in Kub

The Art of Travel: Skill or struggle for survival?

24. October 2018, inke - Discover Namibia

The midday sun is burning fiercely. The air is vibrating. Nothing but flickering rocks and Fata Morganas are seen on the horizon. Damaraland, an endlessly harsh landscape, huge and untamed. The wheels rumble along a barely visible path. Despite air conditioning in the vehicle, the body feels thirsty ... but the cool box is empty. Rule number one for any safari is to be well informed and prepared. Useful behavioural tips and how to survive in the wild are described in the book The Art of Travel, written by the British adventurer, Francis Galton. The book was however published in 1855 and is now - literally - 163 years old and probably the world's first travel guide.

The Art of Travel: Skill or struggle for survival?

The odd shapes of camel thorn pods

12. October 2018, inke - Environment

Wood from camel thorn trees leaves the best embers for a braai (barbecue). Fence posts made from camel thorn decades ago still stand firm, because termites and beetles avoid this wood. Camel thorn trees (Acacia erioloba) are found all over the country except for a narrow strip in the Namib Desert close to the coast. These trees thrive in arid as well as humid conditions. They are heat and frost resistant. For man and beast they are an important source of shade. And they offer food and shelter to countless animals.

The odd shapes of camel thorn pods

Celebrating Love – the Owambo Way

11. October 2018, inke - Culture

“Iyaloo, Iyaloo!” The elder called out her thanks after delivering a torrent of prayers and blessings to the wedding couple seated in front of her. The women around her, dressed in bright cotton traditional dresses, ululated and swished their cow-tail switches in celebration. It was the final day of the week-long wedding when the bride and groom were allowed to enter the groom’s family grounds. In the northern reaches of Namibia, seven-day weddings are the cultural norm...

Celebrating Love – the Owambo Way

To Swakopmund for giving birth and mating

09. October 2018, inke - Environment

During the summer months pregnant copper sharks migrate to the coastal waters near Swakopmund and give birth to their young. By then, males have already moved there to mate with the females later. Anglers had noticed for years that at certain times large copper sharks (Carcharhinus brachyurus), also called bronze whalers or "bronzy" in Namibia, occur near Swakopmund and further north.

To Swakopmund for giving birth and mating

A week in the Zambezi with the Gondwana Collection

05. October 2018, inke - Gondwana Collection, Tourism

Welcome to the Zambezi! Lush waterways adorned with waterlilies and resounding with birdsong; the languid waters of mighty African rivers; and national parks frequented by elephant and buffalo. The pocket of wild land in Namibia’s north-eastern corner is a rich wonderland of rivers and national parks, balancing the more arid swathes of the country perfectly. The beauty is as exceptional and the region holds its own special magic and charm.

A week in the Zambezi with the Gondwana Collection

Namibian economics to the point – September 2018

30. September 2018, inke - Economics

The second quarter saw Namibia’s economy shrink by 0.2 per cent. Petrol and diesel increased by 40 cents per litre, which marks the fourth fuel increase this year. Several multi-million Namibia Dollar investments in the fisheries, energy and business sectors were announced. President Hage Geingob touched down in Guinea and Canada en route to the UN General Assembly in New York during late September. Earlier this month, he attended the China-Africa summit in China. According to latest statistics, white people in Namibia still own 70 per cent of commercial farm land. 

Namibian economics to the point – September 2018

Stay up-to-date with our monthly 'Gondwana Tracks' Newsletter Sign up Today