Gondwana's Newsroom

Showering in the best company in Etosha Safari Camp

26. July 2017, inke - Gondwana Collection

Have you ever shared a shower with an elephant? No? Well then, this unique experience awaits you at the Etosha Safari Camp! The guest rooms now have brand new designs and renovations have finally come to an end. They have been redecorated with new, fresh colours. The Etosha Safari Camp is and will remain a touch of luxury with a touch of African zest for life.

Showering in the best company in Etosha Safari Camp

Postal Runners - The Heroes of Early Communication

21. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Talk about snail mail! That’s putting it mildly. Are the loved ones back home all right? Will head office send the urgently needed bibles or not? German missionaries in Namibia used to have to wait two years before they received an answer to letters sent to the home country. Every now and then they waited in vain. Around 1840 the mail route was not only very long but was also dangerous.

Postal Runners - The Heroes of Early Communication

The man who found the site for Canyon Lodge

20. July 2017, inke - Gondwana Collection

Roland Vincent with the former manager of the Canyon Lodge, Justine Nuxas (right), in front of the old farmhouse that now serves as reception, souvenir shop, kitchen and dining room

“This has become more beautiful than I imagined. The first bungalows were constructed exactly where I recorded them on the floor. The swimming pool should be where the Braai (barbecue) is today. But the current pool location is much nicer.” Roland Vincent visited the Canyon Lodge at the beginning of 2017 with much enthusiasm. He had discovered this idyllic spot from a plane 23 years ago, and Manni Goldbeck was very certain that that was the right place to build a lodge. Near the second largest canyon in the world.

Unfortunately, the spot Vincent found perfect was not on the farm of Augurabis, which was to be opened by Goldbeck and his partner at the time but rather lay on the neighbouring farm Karios. And the plan was not to build a lodge, only a campsite.

The group came together on Augurabis, which with its green bushes and trees, high rocks on the edge of a dry river, and an old farmhouse was ideal for a campsite. Water was abundant, the location protected and quite easy to reach. But, as Roland emphasized, a bit far from the main road and only accessible to off-road vehicles. “We had acquired the Augurabis farm, but we had no money for a lodge and none to buy the neighbouring farm,” said Goldbeck.


Roland Vincent remained stubborn and recommended to build a lodge on the exact place a had chosen. Once or twice he was in the area after the whole things got rolling, and then not again until 31 January 2017. He had never seen the Canyon Lodge, on the edge of the rocky mountains before. Instead, he designed and built a few lodges in central and northern Namibia. All the more surprised when he sat the finished and successful product for the first time, 23 years later. Manni Goldbeck and his partners had covered all the stops. The Gondwana Collection’s first lodge opened in 1996 and has been growing constantly since.

Roland Vincent is now an animal filmmaker. He lives in Mauritius and fondly remembers his time in Namibia, although he endured a few setbacks. “I started building grassy lodges, creating an income for people in the north-east of the country where most grass is harvested. This resulted in fewer fires and a sustainable natural resource,” said Vincent, standing between the bungalows of the Canyon Lodge, in the south of Namibia.

Not only is he fascinated by the unique location between the granite boulders, where the Canyon Lodge is nestled between the rocks today. He is also interested in the rocks along the edge of the Fish River and other dry rivers in the Gondwana Canyon Park area, as there are countless rock engravings. What do they mean, who created them and why, is a mystery. And next to his love for the Canyon Lodge, they are the reason for Roland Vincent to return, and figure out how and with what tools these people had carved the patterns in the hard rock.

Goodbye! 

Dirk Heinrich

The man who found the site for Canyon Lodge

Café of the month: Kameldorn Garten, Otjiwarongo

17. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Travellers are always in need of good grub – and more importantly, places to pull off from the main road, rest and enjoy the surroundings. This month, Kameldorn Garten in Otjiwarongo caught our attention. A favourite stop when travelling north with good food, a shady courtyard, off-road parking and a casual and relaxed atmosphere. Dieter Radeck took over the restaurant in October 2011, bringing with him his cooking expertise. 

Café of the month: Kameldorn Garten, Otjiwarongo

Black-backed Jackal - The Trickster

14. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Like the fox in European folklore, the jackal is often represented in African folk tales as a trickster. Its ability to adapt to changing circumstances and its legendary stealth and cunning have inspired stories about the wily creature that dodges traps and avoids hunters year in year out. The jackal is reputed to be able to obliterate its tracks, feign death and rid itself of fleas by immersing itself in water, only exposing a tuft of sheep’s wool which it holds in its snout.

Black-backed Jackal - The Trickster

Piles of stones a reminder of Haiseb deity

07. July 2017, inke - Discover Namibia

Canyon Village is dedicated to the history and culture of the Nama and Oorlam peoples. Before this Gondwana lodge opened in September 2003, five Namibian artists were engaged to depict scenes from the everyday life of these peoples as it was more than 100 years ago in dozens of murals. The idea was for guests to become acquainted with the people of southern Namibia and to keep alive the past of the Nama that was slowly fading into oblivion. 

Piles of stones a reminder of Haiseb deity

Ringed Blue Cranes offer new insights

06. July 2017, inke - Environment

The Blue Crane, critically endangered in Namibia, occurs exclusively in the Etosha National Park and the Omadhiya lakes, a series of oshanas (seasonally flooded lakes) to the north of the park. To see this rare bird, tourists often visit areas near the Chudop waterhole in the Namutoni area, Salvadora in the Halali area, and recently at Nebrownii, east of Okaukuejo in Namibia’s most famous park.

Ringed Blue Cranes offer new insights

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